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Launch Home # 3

After much deliberation, I finally settled on a new Homepage! Somehow I ended up even more minimalistic than ever before. But now there's interactions! Ah, so fancy, much new, great joy. And a new highlight to freelancing!

#webdesign

Invisible progress and learning

While I haven't finished the new homepage, I have been making progress with web development courses. I love the opportunity the internet can give for those us of with the desire to learn!

#webdesign

Web Dev Blog #1

This all started with my desire to change the design of my site...again. And my schedule changing. Now I feel like I'm allowed to totally redesign my site. All. The. Time. After all, it's all in good educational fun.

#webdesign

My Design: My sketchy anti-trend

The design trend has gone sleek and simplistic. Yet here I am trying to clutter up my site as much as possible with grid-lines and sketchy drawings. All behind the text blocks. Why? It's a perfect mixture of my different parts.

#webdesign

Webflow Review #1

So far, Webflow and I have about a 90% successful relationship. Though if I gave it more money, I'm sure we would get along more.

#webdesign

First Web Dev Interview

I knew it had been a stretch to apply for a full-stack web developer position. However, even if it didn't lead to a job offer, I knew it was worth a shot. At the very least, I got to learn what a web developer interview is like.

#career

Multi-Mediocre

All my life I've had a clear answer to 'What I want to be when I grow up?' However, it seems to change every 2-3 years.

#multipotentialite

Webflow Review #2

It's hard to believe it's been 6 months since my last review. I had titled it with "#1" as if it were part of a series, so I guess it's about time to make it so. Exteriorly not a lot has changed on the site since my last review. I was able to add an actual homepage. Is it exactly what I had planned? 

Plan to Reality

No. 

Is it perfect? No. Was I able to learn some things? Yes.

In the past several months, I've worked my way mostly through a Web Development series on Lynda (the learning system on LinkedIn). Which, by the way, I actually highly recommend. I say actually because I did have my doubts about Lynda but I like it better than Coursera or other online courses. Part of the course is dedicated to CSS, which is sadly my greatest downfall. I like to think I can learn things fairly well. After all, I did have to muster through biochemistry and the citric acid cycle, got a master's in Physiology, and have a paper being published which I did the statistical analysis for. 

Data not real

But CSS... I just can't mentally wrap my head around these words the teachers use. So when it came to my homepage and all its glorious plans, I was a little stumped. It did have quite a bit of animation and transitions I gave up on. And perhaps some odd angles I also gave up on. Which left me with boxes. Simple boxes. Well...sort of simple. Obviously, I wanted them to adjust and move depending on the window or device. I just didn't quite remember how. Was it block? They are block things. What about inline-block? They are in a line... Or Flex? That sounds right...ish. Things should move or flex. Then there was relative vs auto vs absolute. 

What does any of this mean?!?

Now had I been using WordPress would I have had to concern myself with any of this? No. Would I have partially given up and created two slightly-different homepages visible for desktops vs tablets/phones? Ha, probably not.  Was that wise? Also, probably not. But I also would have been stuck with whatever someone else had created. True, you can mess with WordPress CSS... it's just not super easy in my opinion. Therefore, I focus on site functionality and leave specific coding to the professionals. (Sidenote: to read about my great "fun" with WordPress plugins, you can read my first work-blog) 

Here though, I can easily mess around with the different settings and see what happens. I can easily add classes to rows or sections and see which ones work the way I want. It's a learning process. And I do have errors or things I know I could have been better at. Which I may or may not get to before swiping the homepage for my next wave of inspiration. But I'm not upset about it, the whole process is fun. 

Beyond the front page, I've set up my nice https, which I did need the Webflow guide for. Then I set up a possibly horrible tagging system to create 'related blogs'. Since the content is limited to 30 fields, I can only have 2 tags per blog, but it's good enough for now. 

Two 'tags'

I've also discovered Google Search Console and recently attempted to add structured data to my blogs. Not entirely sure if it worked. But I no longer get errors. So that's a plus. And adding a little code box is pretty simple. Also something I haven't been able to do on WordPress. Granted I haven't tried, but it's not exactly obvious.

Why does 1 have tags and the other doesn't? Is CreativeWork even right?

So in the end, will I ever leave? Probably not. Will I volunteer to build sites for other people? Also, probably not. I'll keep my possible errors and long exercises of 'trial and error' to myself. And keep my stress to a minimal "Oh fuck, I just broke it all" and not a "Oh fuck, I'm about to be fired."